Macarthur chronicle campbelltown online dating

The same figures will be found in Waugh's Almanac for 1859. They were all local men, judging by their names: John Howe (leader), and his son-in-law George Loder, Andrew Howe, William Dargan, Philip Thornley, and Benjamin Singleton, after whom a northern town is named. It is interesting to notice the rapid development of the town of Windsor and district during the regime of Governor Macquarie. We have difficulty in locating the buildings numbered 6, 7, 8, and 9. A few years after, what was known as Cope's Farm was sold. Thompson was enabled to accumulate considerable property, and what was more valuable to him, to possess the confidence of some of the most distinguished characters of this country, the consciousness of which surmounted the private solicitude of re-visiting his native country, and led him rather to yield to the wish of passing the evening of his life where his manhood had been meritoriously exerted, than of returning to the land which gave him birth. Thompson's intrinsic good qualities were appreciated by his Excellency the present Governor (Macquarie), who soon after his arrival here was pleased to appoint him a Magistrate, for which situation Mr. This act, which restored him to that rank in Society which he had lost, made so deep an impression on his grateful heart as to induce him to bequeath to the Governor one-fourth of his Fortune. During Governor Macquarie's regime (1810-22) Windsor was really a military settlement. Roads were made, magistrates and clergymen were appointed, churches and schools provided, public buildings erected, such as court house, gaol, military barracks, and hospital. One was made into a temporary chapel in 1810; downstairs a church, upstairs a school, and residence for the chaplain. Three-storey provision store and granary, bought from Andrew Thompson's estate. A large building stood on the site of the present School of Arts, known at the time as the old military hospital, and where soldiers were seen standing on guard. Another three-storey building stood behind the present School of Arts, and was the church in use until the opening of St. We can find no trace of this being used for any other purpose than that of a church and school, and we hesitate to name it No. It consisted of portions of the grants to Joseph Smallwood, and Thomas Riccaby, granted to them in 17. Thompson's natural good sense and a superior knowledge of the laws of his country peculiarly fitted him. This most useful and valuable Man closed his Earthly career on the 22nd Day of October, 1810, at His House at Windsor of which he was the principal Founder in the 37th year of his age, with[in] the Hope of [an] Eternal Life. The above inscription, having become weather-worn, was recut by Travis, of Richmond, about 1908, the coat having been collected in Windsor. Alexander Dandie, who retired on account of advancing years, in 1912, but he only lived a few months after his retirement, as he died on 17th December, 1912, aged seventy-two years. It is with the pioneers who opened the way, and with the men who followed and built and tended the pleasant town of Windsor on the noble river's bank that Mr. He has expended much time and labour in gathering his material and in disinterring from the somewhat dusty chambers of the past the names and deeds of men who "deserve to live." For these services Mr. who would know the early history of Australia must perforce know something of its first granary, the Green Hills, afterwards known as Windsor. These and others made several successive visits to the Hawkesbury River, reaching as far as Richmond Hill. He also built the Governor Bligh, in 1807, which traded to New Zealand. The foundation stone of the present church was laid on 8th December, 1875. The chief laymen during the seventies throughout the whole circuit were:—William Dean, J. Steele deserves the success which I am sure this book will command. BERTIE, Past-President, Australian Historical Society. The substance of this volume ran through the columns of the between August, 1914, end February, 1915. In the year 1794 Lieut.-Governor Major Grose placed the first twenty-two settlers along the banks of the Hawkesbury River and South Creek, railed then Ruse's Creek, as James Ruse, the man who first grew wheat at Parramatta, had a grant of land at the junction of that stream with the Hawkesbury. Corps were sent up, and the settlement of Windsor, then called Green Hills, was fairly launched. Andrew Thompson appears to have had some literary taste, for in an advertisement in the Sydney Gazette, 9th December, 1804, he asked that those to whom he had loaned certain books would kindly return them. Walker (the ancestor of many Methodist ministers), J. Among those present, as circuit minister for a second term, was the Rev. Wilkinson, who was also present when the foundation stone of the burnt church was laid, in 1838.

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Governor Macquarie's reply, granting the citizens' request, is dated from Government House, Windsor, 4th January, 1822. The Cope family lived in the old cottage next the Presbyterian Church; the name appears in the Post Office Directory at 1835. Thompson, Esq., in the Gazette of last week, we should have added an account of the funeral, which took place on Friday Se'nnight (which means seven night), had we in time received it. Cartwright walked foremost, and was followed by Surgeons Mileham and Redfern, who had attended the deceased through the long and painful illness that brought to a conclusion an existence that had been well applied, Next followed the bier, attended by Captain Antill, A. But every fair-minded historian will see that a man who won the esteem of three successive Governors, as well as of all the leading residents of the district in which he lived, including the clergymen, and at whose funeral the whole district followed "their friend and patron" must agree that to call Andrew Thompson a bad citizen is a distortion of plain facts. Richard Fitzgerald arrived in the colony in the ship William and Ann, on the 28th August, 1791, when about nineteen years old. A fresh impetus was given to the church by the settlement of the Rev. Another object of these grain depots was to better control the price of grain, as in times of scarcity the local farmers charged most exorbitant prices, and also tried to prevent importation. On the arrival of Governor Macquarie's successor, Sir Thomas Brisbane, he called for a report on the public buildings of the colony. The milk returns sent by Andrew Thompson to him amounted to £60 0s. In the performance of this heroic work his health was seriously undermined. The foundation stone of a brick chapel, thirty-two feet by sixteen feet, was laid by the Rev. The first era of the history of Green Hills ends here, and the second stage in its history as Windsor begins. Extract from Government and General Order, dated 15th December, 1810, issued on the return of his Excellency Governor Macquarie from an extensive tour of inspection through the various districts where agriculture and the breeding of cattle have occupied the attention of settlers. We have quoted from this report, which was made in 1824, in the articles dealing with the Hospital, St. This is a fitting place to insert some further particulars as to the expenditure and the condition of certain other Windsor buildings:— Extracts from report of the value of the improvements which have taken place in the Public Buildings of Sydney, Parramatta, Windsor, Liverpool, and Campbelltown, from December 25th, 1822, to December 24th, 1823, and an expose of the present state of Public Buildings in New South Wales, by order of his Excellency Sir Thomas Brisbane, made by S. Harris, Architect, in 1824:— "Commissariat Offices, etc.—The office is a shed adjoining the end of the store, about eighty feet long, with two storeys." "The School Room, Old Hospital, Store, and Dr. Andrew Thompson also had a large store-keeping business at the Green Hills (Windsor), which, according to an advertisement in the Sydney Gazette, was taken over by Mr. For the first twenty-five or thirty years of the settlement of New South Wales, the Hawkesbury was looked upon as the granary of the colony. In his house were held several meetings of, local residents, one on 20th January, 1807, to petition the Governor aginst the importation of wheat. Governor Bligh, who took to farming in 1807, bought several holdings on the river, near Pitt Town, near where the present punt is located. A portion of this (six perches) was resumed for public road purposes on 25th January, 1899. When floods came the greatest anxiety was caused in Sydney and Parramatta, and floods were fairly frequent in those days. We might here mention that wheat was selling on 19th January, 1806, at nine shillings and threepence in Windsor, and ten shillings a bushel in Sydney. Some oak trees planted at the time are known to-day as Bligh's oaks. The rest of the land was disposed of when the present manse was purchased, in 1902, as it was not suitable for manse purposes.

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